Austin Young review…April 26, 2013…

AUSTIN YOUNG AND NO DIFFERENCE

BLUE AS CAN BE

VIZZTONE RECORDS  VTAY–003

THUNDERHEAD–BLUE AS CAN BE–DISAPPEARING RAILROAD BLUES–SIGNAL–SPRINGTIME SNOW–MAGDALENA–NOT AS STRONG–WHO’S COMING OUT?–BORROWED TIME–THAT’S IT–GIVE ME ONE GOOD REASON–WALKING THROUGH–MISS YOU MOORE

 

Most seventeen-year-olds are obsessed with the opposite sex, driver’s licenses, and school activities.  For Colorado native Austin Young, we are sure he finds time for these diversions whenever he’s not playing some of the hottest blues guitar you’ll ever hear.  He has just released his latest album for Vizztone, entitled “Blue As Can Be,” containing thirteen band originals that cover several shades of blues and blues-rock.

 

A self-taught guitarist since the age of twelve, he can handle the intricacies of Robert Johnson all the way up to the power grooves of Hendrix and SRV, and do so with ease.  He’s backed by his band, No Difference, which has eighteen-year old Noah Mast on bass, and Austin’s father, Tim, on drums.

 

With the excellent choices of material on this album, the inevitable comparisons to guys like SRV and Joe Bonamassa are going to occur.  However, be assured that Austin is his own man, and plays with scope and passion.  Blues-rock anthems such as the opening “Thunderhead,” “Signal,” and “Not As Strong” show the powerful side of his repertoire, while “Magdalena,” played on an acoustic National steel, and “Disappearing Railroad Blues” both look at love from different perspectives, and show a softer, more Dylan-esque side to the band.

 

Austin can pitch a boogie that’ll fill up the dance floor, too, as evidenced by the roadhouse rock of “Who’s Coming Out?” and the uptown swing of “That’s It.”  And, he reminds us all that no one is guaranteed a tomorrow, and we should live each day to the fullest, because it’s all “Borrowed Time.”

 

We had two favorites, too.  Austin borrows from some of the most popular blues cliches’ to do a down-and-dirty tribute to Muddy, which serves as the set’s title cut.  And, the set closes with a soaring instrumental, “Miss You Moore,” done not only in tribute to the late British bluesman Gary Moore, but to all the greats who have come and gone.

 

Anyone who thinks that the blues is just “old folks music” need only to take a listen to recent releases from Trampled Under Foot, Andy Poxon, Cassie Taylor, and Samantha Fish.  You can sho’ nuff add Austin Young to that list, too, because “Blue As Can Be” marks the beginning of a budding blues superstar!  Until next time….Sheryl and Don Crow.

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