Brigitte DeMeyer review…July 1, 2014…

BRIGITTE DEMEYER

SAVANNAH ROAD

SAVANNAH ROAD–SAY YOU WILL BE MINE–BOYS GOT SOUL–PLEASE BELIEVE ME–BIG MAN’S SHOES–CONJURE WOMAN–HONEY HUSH–WORKER–HOME GROUND–LIGHTNIN’ POOR–SIMMER RIGHT–BUILD ME A FIRE–MY SOMEDAY

Not so long ago, singer-songwriter Brigitte DeMeyer met up with Gregg Allman, then later read his biography and became intrigued by the history of his home base of Savannah, GA.  A born storyteller, Brigitte turned her studies of this storied region into her sixth album, “Savannah Road.”   It is thirteen originals, each of which has its own inspiration, with many written from personal experiences.

Also of note on this set are the sparse, minimal arrangements that allow Brigitte’s beautiful voice to shine thru.  As she studied the history of the Savannah region, she found parts of it to be haunting and downright spooky.  Thus, these arrangements go a long way in cementing that eerie vibe.  And, it sho’ nuff doesn’t hurt to have some of thee greatest players on the planet adding instrumentation throughout, including Will Kimbrough, Ricky and Micol Davis, and Jano Rix, to name just a few.

The title cut leads off, with its summery images of peach country, and “fill those barrels, pick the fruits, and shake those trees down to their roots.”  Fine examples of Southern culinary delights are wrapped up in a couple of love songs, with the “biscuits and jelly” of “Baby, give me some of that Honey Hush,” while love is the key ingredient to that special stew that has to “Simmer Right,” and features sweet harmony from the McCrary Sisters, too.  Brigitte traces her mother’s journey out of Nazi Germany in WWII with the poignant “Build Me A Fire.”    And, Jeff Coffin’s clarinet gives a ragtimey feel to an ode to Man’s Best Friend, who’s “favorite song is your footsteps,” entitled “Big Man’s Shoes.”

We had two favorites, too.  “Lightnin’ Poor” is the tale of a perhaps-mythical street corner bluesman with a “cigar box guitar and chicken-wire strings” who “drives a Cadillac but doesn’t have a telephone!”  This one embodies the spirits of the legends of the past, from Hank Sr.’s Tee Tot right on down to ol’ Curtis Loew.  The McCrarys again add their special touches to this one, too.  And, “Miss Ella James” is the “Conjure Woman” who Brigitte enlists to put a voodoo spell on her lover.  Blue Mother Tupelo’s Ricky Davis brings the mojo with excellent slide guitar, and the lovely Micol Davis adds harmony vocals, and when these two lovely ladies’ voices entwine, it is a little slice of Heaven, indeed!

Brigiitte DeMeyer turns the summer heat up a notch with “Savannah Road.”  Her storyteller’s soul and sparse arrangements that accentuate her delivery makes this one quite an entertaining listen!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, Nashville Blues Society.

We had

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