Boris Garcia review…July 13, 2017…

BORIS GARCIA

AROUND SOME CORNER

PORCHWERK  201601

KNOCKIN’ ON WOOD–MARY FIELDS–3 STEPS–CAPTAIN OF THE CREW–MENDOCINO–I’D DO ANYTHING–DESIRE–FEATHER AND DOWN–WATERS BLUE–ANOTHER DAY–MESSAGE AT TWILIGHT

Boris Garcia is the collective talent of seven extremely-skilled musicians.  They are:  Bob Stirner on guitar and vocals, Jeff Otto on vocals and uke, Bud Burroughs on mandolin and keys, Tim Kelly on all things drum, E J Simpson on bass, Chip Desnoyers on pedal steel, and Tom Hampton on lap steel.  Their fifth album overall, “Around Some Corner,” fuses a little bit of everything—folk, Celtic, Americana, pop, and even a shot of reggae–to get their musical message to the masses.  They called on Tim Carbone to produce, and he had the magic touch over the course of these eleven originals.

Boris Garcia reminded us of Jackson Browne, David Bromberg, and, yes, that “other Garcia” from the Grateful Dead.  They effortlessly move from genre’ to genre’ herein, also.  The set leads off with a waltz, entitled “Knockin’ On Wood,” with our hero returning from a journey frought with “a trail of dust and blood,” and who is now longing for his lover.  The acoustic piano and steel guitar work are exemplary and beautiful.  Another piano-heavy cut, “Mary Fields,” brings to mind classic Sixties pop, while for us anyways, “Mendocino” was the most blues-oriented cut, with an organ and slide guitar that added to its vibe.  “I’d Do Anything” features lively mandolin and is an ode to being a lifelong friend to another, while the next cut, “Desire,” is an ode to true love, the kind that “gave me hope and now I see.”  This one has that good Jackson Browne feel to it, too.

“Feather And Down” is more of a traditional bluegrass romp, and you’ll find it hard not to hear the influences of the Grateful Dead in the instrumentation and time signatures of “Waters Blue.”

We had two favorites, too.  The set-closing “Message At  Twilight” begins with a variation on a reggae groove, before giving way to a more traditional Celtic sound as the song builds to its climax.  And, a sprightly-sounding reel is the good ole “ship song,” complete with recorders and flutes, and details the adventures of “Tom and Huck and me,” who await “The Captain Of The Crew to tell us what to do,” amid rounds of “salt pork, hard tack, and rum” in the ship’s hold!

The seven men of Boris Garcia are all incredibly-talented musicians, vocalists, and composers.  So much so, that the whole of the music in “Around Some Corner” is infinitely greater than the sum of its parts!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

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