Archive for October, 2017

Albert Castiglia review…October 14, 2017….

ALBERT CASTIGLIA

UP ALL NIGHT

RUF RECORDS  CD 1249

HOODOO ON ME–I BEEN UP ALL NIGHT–THREE LEGGED DOG–95 SOUTH–KNOCKED DOWN LOADED–QUIT YOUR BITCHING–WOMAN DON’T LIE–UNHAPPY HOUSE OF BLUES–DELILAH–CHASE HER AROUND THE HOUSE–YOU GOT ME TO THAT PLACE

Over the course of his storied career, South Florida-based bluesman Albert Castiglia has hoodooed on stage with the ol’ Hoodoo Man himself, Junior Wells, gone waaay past those “Bad Year Blues,” and, on his last album, told all of us to “Get Yer @$$ In The Van” for the next gig!  A perennial road dog, he’s back with what will likely prove to be his strongest album to date.  Yup–“Up All Night” has got everything his fans love best about him–blistering solos, that soul-man’s vocal delivery, tunes about life on the road, relationships, both good and bad, with everything aided and abetted by that keen sense of humor.

Want some pure Sixties’ psychedelia?  Then, get yer wah-wah’s out for the title cut, where Albert, in trouble with a lover, sings, “I Been Up All Night, rollin’ joints as big ’round as my thumb!”  “Knocked Down Loaded” will take many of us back to our youth, when we all believed we were ten feet tall and bulletproof, especially when “Jack, black,” and “wine spo-de-o-de” gets involved!  Albert closes the set on a quieter, acoustic note, a cool ode to that special lover who “Got Me To That Place where I want to be!”

Not all the girls herein are on the up and up, tho.  Check out the pure evil of the leadoff lady who “Put The Hoodoo On Me,” and the constant fussing and fighting has him ready to blow an “Unhappy House Of Blues.”  Written by Cyril Neville, Albert relates to the “graveyard love” therein, and it also features harp from Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone.

We had two favorites, too.  Sonny Landreth adds his signature slide licks to the roadhouse boogie of  “95 South,” tracing Albert’s road trip from “DC to SoFlo” and trying to outrun a hurricane!  And, when you’ve been on the road for “a month and 14 days,” when you get home, you want to grab your lover and “Chase Her Around The House,” where the only real choice is whether it’s “the bedroom or the kitchen floor.”

Albert Castiglia has done it again with “Up All Night.”  He left everything the same from his last album, as this one also was laid down at Dockside Studios with the honorable Mike Zito producing.  The only changes were the band members, this time with Jimmy Pritchard on bass, and Brian Menendez on drums.  Everybody played their collective butts off, too.  Mama Esther, you gotta be proud of your son Albert and this stellar set of contemporary blues!  Love to all…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

61 Ghosts review…October 13, 2017….

61 GHOSTS

….TO THE EDGE

BLUZPIK MEDIA GROUP

HEARTBEAT–NO ONE AT YOUR DOOR–WORLD GONE CRAZY–IF TEARS WERE DIRT–SHOW ME YOUR SCARS–PASSION TIPPED ARROW

Joe Mazzari has been playing his grunge-worthy brand of rock and roll since he got his start on the Boston rock scene during the  Eighties.  He’s played CBGB’s, The Peppermint Lounge, and, even the Cavern Club in Liverpool.  Dixie Deadwood made her mark as the  drummer for Bud Welch for several years.  These two powerhouse talents have just released their crackling debut EP under the name 61 Ghosts, entitled, “….To The Edge.”  They utilize the bass guitar stylings of J. D. Sipe over the course of the six strong originals that show why their skills make the whole of this set greater than the sum of its parts.

Joe has one of those gravelly, raw vocal deliveries—think Springsteen after a half-pint of cold Clarksdale ‘shine—and you get the picture.  The band’s sound overall is deep, primal, and hittin’ on all 8 thanks to the rock-solid rhythm section.

The groove starts with the pounding drive of “Heartbeat,” which, literally, jumps outta the speakers and grabs you.  Our hero comes to grips with love gone sour in the mile-a-minute “No One At Your Door, for you don’t need me any more.”  Next up is the song that served as our favorite, altho it has a dark, macabre feel.  The man in “World Gone Crazy” has seen his share of stuff down at the Crossroads, and he’s about to “do things I’ll live to regret.”  Dixie’s percussion and Joe’s guitar lines paint a Doomsday picture of a man who “sees the world thru a wine bottle haze.”

For all the in-yer-face bombast of the first two-thirds of the set, it closes on a rather quiet note.  “Show Me Your Scars,”  for “they’re not your flaws,” is an acoustic reminder that no one is perfect, and it’s ok to “let down your guard.”  The final cut, another acoustic affair, has Joe asking a lover, “has my Passion Tipped Arrow been removed from your chest?”

61 Ghosts brings the music of the Delta into focus as the forebearer, if you will, of rock and roll.  Joe’s guitar and vocals over Dixie’s deft rhythm propulsion is bound to take the listener “….To The Edge.”  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow.

The Original Blues Brothers Band review…October 12, 2017….

STEVE CROPPER, LOU MARINI AND

THE ORIGINAL BLUES BROTHERS BAND

THE LAST SHADE OF BLUE BEFORE BLACK

SEVERN RECORDS  CD  0071

BABY WHAT YOU WANT ME TO DO–CHERRY STREET–ON A SATURDAY NIGHT–ITCH AND SCRATCH–DON’T GO NO FURTHER–YOU LEFT THE WATER RUNNING–DON’T FORGET ABOUT JAMES BROWN–SEX MACHINE–YOUR FEET’S TOO BIG–21ST CENTURY BABY–BLUES IN MY FEET–QUALIFIED–I GOT MY MOJO WORKING–THE LAST SHADE OF BLUE BEFORE BLACK

What began as a musical sketch on “Saturday Night Live” way back in 1978, when Aykroyd and Belushi brought Joliet Jake and Elwood Blues to life as the mythical “Blues Brothers,” has become a world-wide franchise that has spawned two feature films, merchandising of all kinds, and tours by the surviving band members all over the globe.  That’s the cool thing about “The Last Shade Of Blue Before Black,” on Severn Records, as many of these literal “soul survivors,”  keep on rockin’, billed as The Original Blues Brothers Band.

Of the fourteen cuts on this lively set, several are new songs written for this project, while the rest you’ll likely know by heart.  There are so many special guests, it’s almost like the last half-hour of “Blues Brothers 2000.”  Just about everybody is here—Steve “The Colonel” Cropper, “Shiv” Shaffer, Bones Malone, Blue Lou Marini, and a host of others, with a rotating cast of vocalists including Tommy “Pipes” McDonnell, Bobby Harden, and Rob Paparozzi, with special guests Dr. John, Eddie Floyd, and Joe Louis Walker.

Highlights abound. Bobby, Tommy, and Rob kick out the jams with “Baby What You Want Me To Do,” with piano from Randy Cloud.  Eddie Floyd rocks the joint with a tune he and The Colonel wrote back in the day, “me and my baby, and a glass of wine, On A Saturday Night!”  Joe Louis Walker steps up with one of our favorites, “Don’t Go No Further,” with Rob on the big ol’ chromatic harp and another of the originals on guitar, Matt “Guitar” Murphy!”  And, “The Shiv” Shaffer hits it and quits it on the scratchy-funk goodness of “Sex Machine,”

The fellows did not forget New Orleans, either.  Rob is on vocal on the playful “Your Feet’s Too Big,” and The Nite Tripper himself, Dr. John, appears on vocal and piano on a cool tale about the “haves and the have-nots,” “I’m Qualified.”  The set closes with Lou Marini on sax and vocals on the title cut, as he plays the cheatin’ lover who suffers the consequences, and now feels just like “The Last Shade Of Blue Before Black.”

Just as the 1978 skit intended, The Original Blues Brothers Band is all about having fun.  The good times roll on with “The Last Shade Of Blue Before Black!”  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

Rob Lutes review…October 11, 2017….

ROB LUTES

WALK IN THE DARK

LUCKY BEAR RECORDS   MMMG 9550

A LITTLE ROOM–THERE’S NO WAY TO TELL YOU THAT TONIGHT–PUMPING LOVE–I AM THE BLUES–WHISTLING PAST THE GRAVEYARD–WALK IN THE DARK–SPENCE–ROCKY MOUNTAIN TIME–BIGGER–RABBIT–HARDEST THING OF ALL–BELIEVE IN SOMETHING–BETTER PAST

Rob Lutes is a brilliant, soulful Canadian singer-songwriter whose material resides at, one might say, another mythical Crossroads–this one where the blues intersects with folk, Americana, and the music of the greats such as Dylan and Rod McKuen.  An acclaimed finger-style picker with a burnished vocal delivery, he has just released his seventh album,  this one entitled “Walk In The Dark.”  On this set, Rob is on vocals and acoustic guitars, with another noted Canadian player, Rob McDonald, on electric, acoustic, and Resophonic guitars.

Throughout, he looks at love and life, and its highs and lows, through the eyes and ears of a traveling troubadour.  He also pays tribute to some of his heroes along the way, too.  Opening the set is the story of a man in recovery, who was “only starting to find A Little Room,” with “too many things I’d like to erase.”  His tribute to James Cotton is “There’s No Way To Tell You That Tonight,” and features harp from Guy Belanger, while an ode to Bahamian folk artist Joseph Spence is the lightning-fast instrumental, “Spence.”

We had two favorites, too.  Guy”s harp and Bob Staggs’ keys work adds to the sprightly ambience of the Hot Club guitar licks of “Believe In Something,” while he pays a fine tribute to one of the most endearing writers of our generation, John Prine, with the waltz groove of “Rocky Mountain Time,” where  “it’s only the thirsty who hunger to roam.”

Rob Lutes continues to show why he is one of the most compelling storytellers on the blues-roots scene.  His philosophical forays are out now for the world to enjoy, for, “after all, isn’t life really just a Walk In The Dark?”  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow.

Blues With Horns, Vol. 1 review…October 8, 2017….

CHRIS DANIELS AND THE KINGS

WITH FREDDI GOWDY

BLUES WITH HORNS, VOL. 1

MOON VOYAGE RECORDS

SWEET MEMPHIS–FRIED FOOD/HARD LIQUOR–GET UP OFF THE FUNK–SOOTHE ME BABY–WOULDN’T TREAT A DOG (THE WAY YOU TREATED ME)–BABY’S IN LOVE WITH THE RADIO–CAN’T EVEN DO WRONG RIGHT–YOU CAN STAY BUT THAT NOISE MUST GO–THEM CHANGES–RAIN CHECK

Chris Daniels And The Kings, along with Freddi Gowdy, are sho’ nuff on a mission to keep the horn-driven, soul-blues of the Sixties and Seventies alive, and introduce it to a whole new group of fans while sharing it with long-time fans such as us.  Chris and Freddi, both cancer survivors, have been together since ’bout 2009, and Chris And The Kings have 15 albums under their belt, this the second with Freddi.

Want some down-home blues?  Then, order up a slab of ribs from Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous, kick back, and dig the groove of “Sweet Memphis,” with Chris’ vocal ably backed by slide from Sonny Landreth.  Next up is a place many have been to–the neighborhood juke joint–or is it a bucket of blood?  Either way, you can get anything you want, especially, “Fried Food, Hard Liquor, and them down-home blues!”  The party rolls on as Freddi goes into full-on Godfather mode, with “Get Up Off The Funk,” with some cool work from the horny horn section!

That real mother for you, ol’ Johnny Guitar Watson, is featured thru two of his well-known cuts.  First up is a tune about a certain girl who won’t do nothin’, love-wise, as “Baby’s In Love With The Radio.”  And, a tough landlord berates our hero, telling him, “You Can Stay But That Noise Must Go!”  They get into a swingin’, New Orleans-style groove for Elvin Bishop’s tale of hard-luck Maurice, who “Can’t Even Do Wrong Right!”

We had two favorites, too.  We’ve always loved Sam Cooke’s music, and Chris and Freddi nail a song of his popularized by Sam Moore and Dave Prater, “Soothe Me with your kindness,” with a sweet sax break from Jim Waddell.  Chris closes the set with a light-hearted yet poignant look at mortality as told to him by his mother.  “Rain Check” urges us all to “dance every chance I get before I have to go!”

Trust us, if you will.  There’s nothing quite like the music of our youth that was laid down by the likes of Koko  Taylor, Johnnie Taylor, JB, Pickett, and many other legends who brought the horns along for the ride.  Chris Daniels, The Kings, and Freddi Gowdy have got it goin’ on with “Blues With Horns, Vol. 1!”  We say, most definitely, “More, please!!”  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

 

 

 

The Freeway Revival review…October 7, 2017….

THE FREEWAY REVIVAL

REVOLUTION ROAD

GOODBYE–SOUL SURVIVOR–RISE–WISE UP–PEACE–WANDERIN’–SENSE OF WONDER–EVEN IF IT RAINS–ANGEL IN RHYMES–WHEN IT BREAKS–CRICKETS

As one listens to Asheville-based The Freeway Revival,  especially folks from our g-g-g-generation, you’re gonna hear a little bit of everything we’ve grown up with–the Allmans, Garcia-era Dead,  Dylan, on up thru the likes of Gov’t Mule, the CRB, and Tedeschi-Trucks on today’s scene.  We don’t want to call them “Southern rock,” because, altho they have Southern roots, this music is much, much more.  The band consists of twin brothers Adam (on keys) and Jonathan Clayton, (on guitar), coupled with second guitarist Tim Husk, bassist Kenny Crowley, and, uber-drummer Cartwright Brandon.  This brotherhood, if you will, released a self-titled EP in 2016, and have basically toured non-stop since then, barely having the time to lay down the tracks for this set, their first full-length effort, entitled “Revolution Road.”

Their incredible musicianship, collaborative songwriting and spot-on harmony arrangements make this set special.  The set opens with guitars blazing on “Goodbye,” a song that teaches us to get rid of all the negatives in life, and features a fine psychedelic-ish solo at the halfway point.  “Peace” has some haunting harp in the foreground, and the fellows use this song to try and offer up a resolution to the current insanity throughout the world today, where “we all blame each other, but we’ve all got dirty hands.”  Cartwright Brandon kicks off the muscle of “Soul Survivor” with some percussion right outta Woodstock-era Santana, set over a groove with a cool New Orleans vibe.

Those golden harmonies “keep these wheels rollin” on “Wanderin,” while “Sense Of Wonder” follows a Doomsday beat over the vocal lead urging us to “break down those walls of animosity,” before giving way to a blistering solo.   The set closes on perhaps its most upbeat vibe, with “Crickets”  again driven by stutter-step guitar and fierce percussion, before another mighty solo.

With “Revolution Road,” The Freeway Revival are not out to reinvent the wheel–they just want to make sure those wheels roll in a positive direction.  Their mission is to bring their message to as many new fans as they can, and they’ve just gotten two more with us.  These young men spread peace, love, and great music wherever they go!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

Ilana Katz Katz review…October 6, 2017….

ILANA KATZ KATZ

SUBWAY STORIES

VIZZTONE VT-IKK-111

DON’T FORGET–RILEY AND SPENCER–SUBWAY BLUES–MOTHERLESS CHILD–POISON DAYS–LIKE A WINO–ICE CREAM FREEZER BLUES–REQUIEM–TRIBUTE TO SLIM HARPO–THE EXCUSE–ROAD TO NOWHERE–DON’T CROSS THAT LINE–JOHN BROWN’S DREAM/SUBWAY LIGHT OF MINE

Ilana Katz Katz got her start in 2008 as a busker, playing her fiddle and singing on Boston’s crowded subway platforms.  A chance meeting with Ronnie Earl led to her “discovery,” if you will, as he took her under his wing, playing on her debut album.  Her fiddle and lilting, bluesy voice have served her well since her salad days, and she has just completed her third overall release, aptly-entitled “Subway Stories,” for VizzTone.  The set consists of thirteen songs, several written by Ilana solely or with producer/guitarist Barry Levenson, he of Canned Heat fame.  The rest are well-played covers that showcase her affinity for traditional fiddle tunes, old-time blues, and jazzy scat-singing.

One of those originals leads off, as Barry hits and “endless boogie” groove over Ilana’s vocal, name-checking many of our blues heroes, imploring us, “Don’t Forget their names.”  “Riley And Spencer,” a traditional tune about two hard-drinking ramblers,  and “Motherless Child,” shows the ease with which she handles this type of material.

Barry does some mighty fine Berry-pickin’ over piano supplied by Mr. Fifty Shades Of Blue himself, Anthony Geraci, as Ilana plays the part of the somewhat schizophrenic lover who, “after all this time, still loves you Like A Wino loves his wine!”  Ilana and the fellows have a lot of fun with the slow-blues of her autobiography of sorts, “Subway Blues,” and again with the swampy, good-times of “Tribute To Slim Harpo,” both featuring harp from Sugar Ray Norcia.

We had two favorites, too.  Ilana closes the set with a sho’ nuff hoedown throwdown, with an extended fiddle break on the traditional “John Brown’s Dream,” which segues’ into “Subway Light Of Mine,” featuring just her fiddle and vocal.  And, we can only imagine the response she gets in the subway when she breaks into Roosevelt Sykes’ bawdy-riffic “Ice Cream Freezer Blues!”

Ilana Katz Katz takes the listener on a sweet journey from the traditional up thru the contemporary with her fiddle skills and ethereal voice.  When she’s not on the road, you can still catch her bringing fun to the folks on Boston’s underground lines, and “Subway Stories” has some tales to tell!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

Leonard Griffie review….October 5, 2017….

LEONARD GRIFFIE

BETTER LATE THAN NO TIME SOON

PANGOBOY  PRODUCTIONS

LOOK ME IN THE EYE–I’M NOT LIKE THAT–I GOT NEWS–WHAT’S A MAN TO DO–WHAT YOU GOT IS WHAT YOU GET–LEAVE THIS TOWN–I DO LOVE YOU–YOU DONE STEPPED IN IT NOW–GOIN DOWNHILL–AIN’T NO HAPPY HOME–UP AND AT ‘EM–BETTER LATE THAN NO TIME SOON–A DOLLAR OR TWO–I’M GOOD WHERE I AM–

One thing you will notice when you listen to Leonard Griffie and his latest album, “Better Late Than No Time Soon,” is his incredible versatility within various shades of the blues.  Aptly described as The Guitar Monster by Steve Spoulos of KRVM Radio in Eugene, OR, Leonard takes us on a journey filled with horn-filled soul/blues, Fifties-inspired songs, traditional shuffles, and, even a few forays into the blues’ jazzier side.

All the cuts were written or co-written by Leonard, and of the set’s fourteen cuts, there are highlights all over the place.  The party kicks off with a cool song about a relationship on the skids, as Leonard begs a lover to “Look Me In The Eye and try and tell the truth,” set over a funky horn arrangement, bringing to mind vintage Albert King.  He pledges allegiance to a new lover, assuring her “I ain’t no alley cat–I’m Not Like That,” then finds out a few cuts later that she might be a big tease, and asks all us guys, “What’s A  Man To Do–no time to make love–all she wants to do is run around.”

The band breaks breaks off a couple of sweet, jazz-themed instrumentals, with “Up And At “Em,” and the set-closing, “I’m Good Where I Am,” each featuring exemplary keys work from Michael Vannice behind Leonard’s expressive guitar work.  And, our favorite was a song about a place we’ve all been to on occasion, where nothin’ goes right, and, no matter what you do, “You Done Stepped In It Now!”  Leonard lays down some mean slide on this more traditional, straight-blues cut.

Leonard Griffie found the winning combination for a great blues album with “Better Late Than No Time Soon.”  A great mix of songs that will appeal to a wide base of fans, stellar guitar work with a fine team of backing musicians,  and strong, soulful vocals are all present and accounted for on this fine set!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow.

Val Starr And The Blues Rocket review….October 4, 2017….

VAL STARR

AND THE BLUES ROCKET

I ALWAYS TURN THE BLUES ON

SANDWICH FACTORY RECORDS

HIGH TIME TO GO–I ALWAYS TURN THE BLUES ON–WHAT HAPPENS AFTER MIDNIGHT (NOTHIN GOOD)–WHETHER BLUES–YOU BETTER STOP–PLEASE DON’T GO AWAY MAD–BAD LUCK AND THE BLUES–OUT WITH THE OLD–THE BABY MAMA SONG–BLIND EYE–BYE BYE–IT’S ALWAYS SOMETHIN’

Sacramento-based woman of the blues, Val Starr, has one of those special, easy-on-the-ears voices, tailor-made for the twelve original cuts that comprise her latest album with her band, The Blues Rocket, “I Always Turn The Blues On,” for Sandwich Factory Records.   On this set, Val is on lead vocals and plays the  rhythm guitar parts.  The other members of The Blues Rocket are John Ellis on bass, Frankie Soul on lead guitar, and Paul Farman on drums.  The songs, all written by Val, deal with some of life’s trickiest situations–falling in love, and then knowing when to get out, with everything that happens in between.

A great man once told us you gotta know when to fold ’em,  and that’s the theme of the leadoff shuffle, “it’s High Time for that man To Go!”  Special guest Todd Morgan adds a jazzy piano, and Tim Barron’s harp sweetens the ambience of the title cut,    as “there ain’t no other music that makes my body whole.”  A funked-up number written for her teenagers might well serve some of us older folks, as we all know, “What Happens After Midnight ain’t Nothin Good!”  Val bumps and grinds her way thru a story about her seemingly-endless hard times, as “there’s nothing bothering me except Bad Luck And The Blues.”   She closes the set on a similar note with the Chicago-styled romp reminding us that from a flat tire to just plain forgetting important stuff, “It’s Always Somethin’ to screw up your day!”

We had two favorites, too.  Val gets in a playful mood as she’s got that “one thing” on her mind, wanting to “lock the doors and turn out the lights” with “The Baby Mama Song.”  And,  given the recent events in the news, she offers up a poignant ode to today’s  totally messed up society.  “Whether Blues”—“whether you’re black, whether you’re white,” or whatever your lot in life,  Val uses this song as a clarion call for the insanity to stop.

We like to think that we follow Val’s sage advice with the cuts on this album.  “I Always Turn The Blues On” to get uplifted, and, so will you when you give this one a spin!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

Jack Tempchin review….October 2, 2017….

JACK TEMPCHIN

PEACEFUL EASY FEELING

THE SONGS OF JACK TEMPCHIN

BLUE ELAN RECORDS   BER 1049

PEACEFUL EASY FEELING–PART OF ME, PART OF YOU–SLOW DANCING–THE ONE YOU LOVE–SOUL SEARCHIN’–ALREADY GONE–PRIVACY–EVERYBODY’S GONNA LOVE SOMEBODY TONIGHT–PARTYTOWN–IT’S YOUR WORLD NOW

We must admit, we were a bit awestruck when we first found out we had the opportunity to review the latest set from Jack Tempchin.  It is entitled “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” and, that title is part of what makes Jack so special.  For the few who may not know, nine of the ten cuts on this set were all recorded by or written with his friend of 46 years, Glenn Frey.  Two of the cuts are a part of the best-selling album of the 20TH Century, “The Eagles Greatest Hits, 1971-1975.”  The remainder, save for “Slow Dancing,” itself a hit for Johnny Rivers, were either recorded by the Eagles or by Glenn Frey during his successful solo career.

We didn’t know what more could be said about these songs that hasn’t already been said, but Jack made it easy.  He takes the guitar solo on the title cut, and, on “Already Gone” and “It’s Your World Now,” Jack is joined by Chris Hillman on mandolin, and Herb Pedersen on dobro, giving  those songs a new dimension.

Jack is joined by labelmate and Blues Award winner Janiva Magness on “Soul Searchin,” and by Rita Coolidge on the song that was a hit for Johnny Rivers, “Slow Dancing (Swayin’ To The Music).”  There’s one cut that was penned by Jack and Glenn that was previously unreleased, a cool song about Big Brother always watching, “I want my Privacy.”  It’s got some grungy, porn-flick guitar to add to its paranoid ambience!  Our favorite was from Glenn’s solo effort, “No Fun Aloud.”  Jack keeps the debauchery flowin’ right along with the shooters down at “Partytown,” with the only thing missing being the “Monstertones”–Jimmy Buffett, Jimmy Connors, and John McEnroe on the backing chorus–from the original!

With “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” Jack Tempchin lays out a heartfelt tribute to his great friend and fellow composer, Glenn Frey.  Fans, this is a set to be savored….Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow.