Archive for December, 2017

Little G. Weevil review….December 3, 2017….

LITTLE G. WEEVIL

SOMETHING POPPIN’

VIZZTONE VTLG-02

HERE I COME KNOCKING–SOMETHING POPPIN–SEE ME IN THE COUNTRY–HOW DO YOU WANT ME TO DEAL WITH THIS–YOU CAN’T SAY NOTHING–SCRUB–PUSHERMAN–CRAWLING–I DON’T WANT TO FEEL THE RAIN–TOP MODEL

For his latest set for Vizztone, multi-award-winning bluesman Little G. Weevil has created what he refers to as “21ST Century Rhythm And Blues,” and the nine originals and one cover that comprise “Something Poppin” draw from a deep wellspring of sources.  Little G is a native of Budapest who currently calls Atlanta his adopted home, and this set hearkens back to the days of classic Seventies’ soul, funk, blues, with even a nod to the “blaxploitation” film craze from that era, and he puts his own contemporary spin on each track.

The set opens on a sizzling, percussion-and-slide guitar-driven note with a stone party anthem and ode to groupies everywhere, “Here I Come Knocking.”  The many virtues of the girls here in the South are the theme of the title cut, while Danny Del Toro’s harp adds the spice to the Hill Country stomp of “See Me In The Country.”  He hits that deep 70’s soul groove with “How Do You Want Me To Deal With This,” as he comes to grips with an unfaithful lover, featuring great keys from Matyas Premecz.  Dulzura adds guest duet vocal on the contemporary soul of “Scrub,” while G closes the set with another pounding blueser, the story of a “downtown, uptown” honey who’s hell on heels, that “Top Model,” and G “really wants to make her mine!”

Our favorite was the sole cover.  G and the band hit that rock-solid, wah-wah groove we first heard as teens back in the day on Curtis Mayfield’s “Superfly” soundtrack, with its poignant question, “how long can a good thing last,” the sordid tale of the neighborhood “Pusherman.”

Little G. Weevil knows that if you want to hang around in contemporary blues, you gotta have more than good looks and three chords.  He’s upped his game considerably with his groundbreaking approach to the blues with the honesty of “Something Poppin.”   Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.

Popa Chubby review…December 1, 2017….

POPA CHUBBY

TWO DOGS

POPA CHUBBY PRODUCTIONS

IT’S ALRIGHT–RESCUE ME–PREEXISTING CONDITIONS–SAM LAY’S PISTOL–TWO DOGS–DIRTY OLD BLUES–SHAKEDOWN–WOUND UP GETTING HIGH–CAYOPHUS DUPREE–ME WON’T BACK DOWN–CHUBBY’S BOOGIE–BONUS TRACKS–SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL (LIVE)–HALLELUJAH (LIVE)

Bronx native Popa Chubby (Ted Horowitz) had a lot to get off his chest with his latest album, “Two Dogs.”  Fueled by the polarization of a nation, the twelve cuts herein bristle with a call to arms as well as to offer an olive branch to restore peace and harmony.  He wrote eight of the tracks, and daughter Tipitina wrote two cuts, and handles trumpet and horn arrangement duties.  Longtime collaborator Dave Keyes is on keys, with Andy Paladino on bass, and Freightrain Bryant on drums.

The set blasts off with Chubby’s guitar and Dave’s piano laying down a story of reassurance to a lover, where “It’s Alright” to lean on each other.   The title cut, with its definitive Hendrix overtures, is the point Chubby is trying to make with the whole set.  Of “Two Dogs,” one good and one evil, it is up to us to decide which one we feed and reap the consequences thereof.  Chubby defiantly spits in the faces of those who would oppress others in “Me Won’t Back Down,” and closes the set with two live cuts.  First, a rousing blitzkreig of “Sympathy For The Devil,” from La Bikini in Toulouse, France, followed by a somber, poignant call for peace by way of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah,” done in front of a hometown crowd at The Falcon in Marlboro, NY.  This one features only Chubby’s voice and guitar, and Dave’s acoustic piano.

Our favorite had more bite than a rabid pit bull.  Trying to single-handedly repeal and replace the Orange Comb-Over, Chubby, over a rocked-up horn arrangement, fires a right cross to the jaw of 45 as he laments the loss of his health insurance, fearing that “I’m gonna die of Preexisting Conditions!”

If you have followed Chubby’s career for any length of time, you know he’s waaaay more than just a bluesman.  He owes as much to Lemmy and Jimi as he does to Muddy and Buddy, and “Two Dogs” reaffirms his position as one of the most passionate and innovative players on the scene today!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow.

Bobby Kyle review…December 1, 2017….

BOBBY KYLE

IT’S MY LIFE

JUICY BABY RECORDS

DAILY BREAD–LOST AND FOUND–DRIFTWOOD–IT’S MY LIFE–HIGHWAY MAN–BLOOD FROM A STONE–TOMORROW NIGHT–I’VE GOT MY BLOODSHOT EYES ON YOU–SOMEONE ELSE IS STEPPIN’ IN–TRIPPING OUT–I WON’T BE HOME TONIGHT–LITTLE BOY BLUE

East Coast blues veteran Bobby Kyle has quite an impressive resume’ over the last 40-odd years.  He’s an accomplished guitarist, composer, and vocalist.  He’s learned licks from Lonnie Mack, and played alongside Bill Dicey, Eddie Kirkland, and Johnny Copeland.  His latest album, along with his backing band, The Administers, is entitled, “It’s My Life,” and it is twelve cuts of blues, funk, and a touch of jazz and Americana, with half the cuts being Bobby’s originals.

Bobby has one of those “well-worn” vocal styles that leans more toward the Springsteen side of the register, and it serves this material well.  Check out the Memphis flavor of a love affair on the rocks, with a new home—the “Lost And Found,” with a sweet horn arrangement from Laron :Land.  A cool shot of that roots-rock is “Driftwood,” with accordion from our multi-talented friend, Dave Keyes, and Bobby stands up to a demanding lover in the blue-eyed soul of the title cut, ’cause “It’s My Life, baby, and I do as I choose!”

We had several favorites, too.  With a “smile on my face, and you didn’t put it there,” a no-good lover gets told “while you were steppin’ out, Someone Else Was Steppin’ In!”  “Tomorrow Night” was originally recorded by Lonnie Johnson, and Bobby, with Little Sammy Davis on harp, gives  it a sweet jazz-blues read herein.  The set closes with Bobby takin’ us all down to the Delta for Robert Jr. Lockwood’s classic “Little Boy Blue,” rockin’ that Resonator for all it’s worth, this time with Joey Simon on the harp.

Bobby Kyle and the Administers have brought a varied and eclectic set to the table with “It’s My Life.”  It continues his lifelong ambition to spread the gospel of the blues to fans everywhere!  Until next time…Sheryl and Don Crow, The Nashville Blues Society.